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Posts Tagged ‘modal buddy’

4.75 Tone Bones - Almost perfect but not quite

NineBuzz Software: Modal BuddySummary: Whether you’re a rank beginner who wants to learn about modes or a seasoned player looking for a quick refresher and reference tool, Modal Buddy provides a fresh, easy-to-understand reference that demystifies much of the hub-bub behind modes.Pros: Made for the iPhone, but easily viewable on the iPad (which is what I have the app on). Clear, step-by-step method of introducing modes. Touches on the fundamental theory behind modes, but doesn’t get bogged down in all the intricacies. Also has great backing tracks to practice.

Cons: My only nit with product is that it would be helpful to have examples of all the modes so users can hear what all the modes sound like. I suppose it’s easy enough to just discover that while playing against one of the backing tracks. But it would be a nice touch to hear an example to know what to expect.

Price: $4.99

Tone Bone Rating: 4.75 ~ As simple and straight-forward as this app is, over the months that I’ve had it, I’ve returned to it several times to brush up. I’m definitely not an academic as far as playing guitar is concerned, and Modal Buddy is a great way to both learn and practice the fundamentals of modes without having to do a deep-dive into theory.

UPDATE: The app is made for the iPhone, but I run Modal Buddy on my iPad. According to Ron at NineBuzz, Modal Buddy does include example solos of all the modes. So please base my rating on running the app on an iPad.

For the better part of my performing career, I’ve played solos purely by feel. And in the past, I’ve done some leads where I ask myself, “Where the hell did I pull that out from?” What I didn’t know at those times was that unconsciously, I was applying a mode over the chord progression. But being as busy as I have been over the last several years, I didn’t – or perhaps couldn’t – take the time to investigate and analyze what I had done.

But a couple of years ago during the holiday season, I was coming up with a more contemporary arrangement of the carol, “Do You See What I See.” In the middle of tooling around with the arrangement, which I recorded so that my church band could get a feel for the arrangement, I started playing a lead that really intrigued me. I figured it was a mode, so I stopped what I was doing, then went to YouTube to find some instructional videos and possibly find out about what I was playing.

The very first video I found pretty much changed everything for me with respect to improvisation. This was by Rob “Chappers” Chapman, and I often return to it to review modes (plus Chappers is pretty funny). From that video, I realized that I was playing an F Lydian mode over a C-Bb chord progression, which gave it this really cool sustained feel. From that point on, I started investigating and learning about modes in earnest.

But to be totally honest, once you figure out how modes work; especially from such clear explanations such as those that Chappers gives, they’re really not all that mystical. But as with anything, you have to practice, and especially for someone like me who has never really taken an academic approach to music, what you need are good references. This is where Modal Buddy has become a extremely handy for me.

I took the advice of Joe Satriani in a video he did on modes and learned just a couple of modes at first; specifically, Dorian and Lyrdian. I don’t recall Joe specifically mentioning these on the video, but those were the two that made sense to me to start out with; especially Dorian because it was so easy to get to – at least for me – from a tonic, and I could easily combine it with minor pentatonic in the relative major for a minor chord progression. For me, that was totally cool to discover because for a chord progression in Am as the root chord, I could do a G Dorian, then switch to the minor pentatonic in C if I got lost, and believe me, I got lost a lot at first. 🙂 But I still use that combination just because it sounds great to me!

Sorry for the minor detour, but with respect to Modal Buddy, having a reference for the modes (it focuses on the key of G), has been invaluable for me because as opposed to going into all the deep theory (especially interval spelling, which I hate), Modal Buddy presents a mode in such a way that it’s easy to just pick up.

Granted, my only nit is that Modal Buddy only provides an example lead for the Dorian mode, and I’d like to be able to hear all of them. But with the practice tool, you can play the G scale yourself over the backing tracks. Come to think of it, that’s probably what the intent was in the first place: Rather than provide audio examples, they make you practice. Oh well… 🙂 And here’s an important point about modes that the practice tool gives you: You learn to hear what a mode sounds like given a particular chord sequence. To me, being able to hear the mode is far more important than having the intellectual knowledge of it. When you can hear a mode, you can play it. That doesn’t necessarily apply when you just learn the theory.

Now some people who get the app may say, “There’s really not much to it.” But that’s the beauty of Modal Buddy. It gives you a quick reference on modes and doesn’t bog you down in the deep theory. If you want that, you can read a book, or go on YouTube for that stuff. For me, having the most important fundamentals of modes available to me is a lot more important than having an academic understanding. After all, I gig 3-4 times a week, and I just don’t have the time to spend studying.

Modal Buddy is by no means the do-all and end-all to modes. But as the name implies, it’s a great companion app to have around when you need to quickly brush up.

ROCK ON!

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